Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Course & Subject Guides

Resources for Health Care Compliance Graduate Certificate Program: APA 6th Edition

This guide is designed to offer resources and research help for students in the Health Care Compliance Graduate Certificate Program.

Online APA Citation Resources

Writing Centers

Need someone to review your paper? Visit the Writing Center or Academic Success Center on your campus.

What is APA Style?

APA (American Psychological Association) Style originated in 1929, when a group of psychologists, anthropologists, and business managers convened and sought to establish a simple set of procedures, or style rules, that would codify the many components of scientific writing to increase the ease of reading comprehension.

As with other editorial styles, APA Style consists of rules or guidelines that a publisher observes to ensure clear and consistent presentation of written material. It concerns uniform use of such elements as selection of headings, tone, and length, punctuation and abbreviations, presentation of numbers and statistics, construction of tables and figures, citation of references, and many other elements that are a part of a manuscript. (Source: Official APA website)

In-text Citation with APA

The APA style calls for three kinds of information to be included in in-text citations. The author's last name and the work's date of publication must always appear, and these items must match exactly the corresponding entry in the references list. The third kind of information, the page number, appears only in a citation to a direct quotation.

....(Crockatt, 1995).

Direct quote from the text

"The potentially contradictory nature of Moscow's priorities surfaced first in its policies towards East Germany and Yugoslavia," (Crockatt, 1995, p. 1).

APA 7th Citation Examples

Material Type

In-text Citation

Bibliography

A book

(Sapolsky, 2017)

Sapolsky, R. M. (2017). Behave: The biology of humans at our best and worst. Penguin Books.

Chapter in an edited book

(If the chapter is from an authored book, use the book citation)

(Dillard, 2020) Dillard, J. P. (2020). Currents in the study of persuasion. In M. B. Oliver, A. A. Raney, & J. Bryant (Eds.), Media effects: Advances in theory and research (4th ed., pp. 115–129). Routledge.

An article in a print journal

(Weinstein, 2009)

Weinstein, J. (2009). “The market in Plato’s Republic.” Classical Philology, 104(4), 439-458. 

An article in an electronic journal

 (Grady et al., 2019)

Grady, J. S., Her, M., Moreno, G., Perez, C., & Yelinek, J. (2019). Emotions in storybooks: A comparison of storybooks that represent ethnic and racial groups in the United States. Psychology of Popular Media Culture8(3), 207–217. https://doi.org/10.1037/ppm0000185

A website

(Bologna, 2019)

Bologna, C. (2019, October 31). Why some people with anxiety love watching horror movies. HuffPost. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/anxiety-love-watching-horror-movies_l_5d277587e4b02a5a5d57b59e

Most of these examples came from the Reference Examples page on the APA website. Use the same format for print books and ebooks. For ebooks, the format or device (e.g., Kindle) is not included in the reference.

DOI and URL Flowchart

In order to simplify when to use a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) and a URL (Uniform Resource Locator) in your citations, APA published this flow chart.

(Click on image to enlarge)