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Course & Subject Guides

Emerging Markets - BRICS & CIVETS Resources @ Pitt (Brazil, India, Russia, China, South Africa & Colombia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Egypt, Turkey, South Africa and more ...): Getting Started

This guide is designed to provide selected high-quality resources for those interested in emerging market economies. It features individual country pages as well as sources searchable by topic or country.

About This Guide . . .

This LibGuide is designed to provide you with scholarly, high-quality print-based and web-based resources about emerging market countries.

It also identifies major national and international resources. The information included here is not all inclusive and  should be treated as starting points for your research.  The tabs at the top of the page will connect you to categories of resources and information.

Emerging Market Country Links

The countries include the following emerging and leading economies: 

By Continent:

By acronynms:

This guide includes general and specific country resources. Individual country pages include links to general history and culture related websites, as well as news resources and official government websites. 

Click on the country's name link above, or select from the drop-down menu under the "Resources by Country" tab above.

What are the "Next 11 / N-11 emerging markets?

In 2001, Jim O’Neill, Goldman Sachs' chief economist, created the term BRIC.  In 2005 he identified the “Next 11” (N-11) growth markets - the countries that are widely regarded as the most likely to rise quickly in economic prominence over the coming decades.

This image has been created from the Blank World Map and released into the public domain by its authors Zuanzuanfu/Vardion.  It is posted to WikiMedia Commons and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The N-11 or  "Next 11" emerging market countries are Bangladesh, Egypt, *IndonesiaIran, * Mexico , Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, * South Korea, * Turkey, Vietnam .   

* = MIST or MIKT countries of Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea and Turkey are O'Neill's most promising quartet of the N-11 countries.

More recently O'Neill has coined another term – "MIST" or “MIKT” or "TIMS" – to describe a quartet of the Next 11 countries that appear to be the most promising for western investors: Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea and Turkey.

Map of BRICS and CIVETS


Map of O'Neill's BRICS countries

Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa

Image courtesy of Quora. 

 

Map of EIU's CIVETS Countries

Colombia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Egypt, Turkey, and South Africa

File:CIVETS.svg

Image courtesy of Wikipedia. 

What are BRICS and CIVETS?

BRIC, an acronym coined by Goldman Sachs economist Jim O'Neill in 2001, refers to the 4 fastest growing emerging economies over the previous decade. The countries differ immensely geographically, politically, socially, economically, and culturally but share strong growing and emerging economies. In 2011, South Africa was formally accepted into the BRIC alliance.

BRIC or BRICS refers to:

Variations include: BRIICS which includes Indonesia and South Africa with the original 4 countries.

CIVETS, an acronym coined by economists at the EIU (Economist Intelligence Unit) in 2008, refers to Colombia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Egypt, Turkey and South Africa. These emerging market countries are widely regarded as the most likely to rise quickly in economic prominence over the coming decades. The acronym plays off the term BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) which indicates the fastest growing emerging economies over the last decade. (Investopedia.com)  

CIVETS countries, the next generation of "tiger economies," share fast growing, relatively diverse economies as well as large, young (under 30) populations. As a result the countries have great potential for high growth in domestic consumption. These countries include:

Click on the country's name link above, or select from the drop-down menu under the "Resources by Country" tab above.

Liaison Librarian and Reference / Instruction

Christopher Lemery's picture
Christopher Lemery
Contact:
207E Hillman Library